Tongue and Lip Tie Release

Specialized Care for Overall Wellness

Infant Tongue and Lip Tie Release

We take immense pride in providing expert care for your precious little ones. Under the guidance of Dr. Geisler, a highly experienced practitioner, our dedicated team specializes in offering tailored procedures to address tongue and lip ties in infants. Dr. Geisler has focused her advanced education on this crucial area of care since 2017, and her expertise has earned the trust of over two thousand families.

Tongue-tie release Plymouth MN

Referred by Specialists Across the Region

Our reputation extends far and wide, as numerous lactation specialists, feeding specialists, dentists, orthodontists, chiropractors, cranial sacral therapists, speech and language pathologists, pediatricians, and physical and occupational therapists routinely refer patients to us for evaluation and treatment. The resounding trust placed in our expertise by these specialists speaks volumes about the quality of care we provide and the transformative impact of our services.

A Testimonial of Trust

One of the greatest testaments to our dedication is the number of families who return with their next baby seeking our help and refer their family and friends. We are deeply honored by the trust bestowed upon us by these families, and it fuels our commitment to excellence in every aspect of our practice.

Dr Geisler was very knowledgeable and shared lots of information regarding infant tongue and lip tie. I knew my infant was receiving the best diagnosis, treatment and care. Highly recommend!!

Kristina Barten

Terms to Know:

Lingual Frenulum: a natural connective tissue holding the tongue to the mouth’s base

Lingual Frenectomy or Frenuloplasty: tongue tie release

Maxillary Labial Frenulum: a natural connective tissue holding the upper lip to the upper gums

Buccal Frenulum: holding the cheeks to the upper gums in the canine area

More Definitions

Gentle Release with Advanced Technology

When necessary, Dr. Geisler performs gentle Frenectomy procedures for infants under 18 months using a state-of-the-art carbon dioxide laser. This advanced technology allows for precise and minimally invasive releases, minimizing discomfort for your baby. Throughout the process, we keep your baby swaddled and awake, prioritizing their safety.

A Comforting and Supportive Environment

We understand the importance of creating a positive and nurturing environment for both your baby and your family. After the procedure, we provide a calm and supportive setting in our dedicated infant feeding room, where parents can comfort and feed their baby. Our goal is to ensure that your little one feels secure and cared for as they recover from the procedure.

Adolescent & Adult Tongue and Lip Tie Release

Comprehensive Evaluation and Care

At our facility, we believe in a comprehensive and compassionate approach to care. Dr. Geisler takes the time to thoroughly evaluate each patient, considering all aspects of their well-being. During the evaluation, she discusses the presence and potential impact of tongue and lip ties. This collaborative approach ensures that the patients or their families are well-informed and empowered to make the best decisions for themselves or their little ones. When diagnosing a tongue tie, we also discuss the appropriate timing for a frenectomy. This may involve a “functional frenuloplasty” for adolescents and adults using sutures, while for babies under 18 months, we utilize a CO2 laser, leaving the site open. Can You Release the Day of The Consultation?

Partnering in the Transformative Journey

As you embark on this transformative journey with us, we assure you that our compassionate team is here to support you every step of the way. Trust us to provide the best care for you or your little ones, as we strive to enhance oral function and overall well-being!

What is a Frenectomy or Frenuloplasty?

The frenulum, a natural connective tissue holding the tongue to the mouth’s base, can lead to various problems if it restricts movement and function. A tongue tie release, termed as frenotomy, frenectomy, or frenuloplasty, improves mobility by modifying the frenulum, addressing any limitations.

Infant Tongue and Lip Tie Release

We take immense pride in providing expert care for your precious little ones. Under the guidance of Dr. Geisler, a highly experienced practitioner, our dedicated team specializes in offering tailored procedures to address tongue and lip ties in infants. Dr. Geisler has focused her advanced education on this crucial area of care since 2017, and her expertise has earned the trust of over two thousand families.

Tongue-tie release Plymouth MN

Referred by Specialists Across the Region

Our reputation extends far and wide, as numerous lactation specialists, feeding specialists, dentists, orthodontists, chiropractors, cranial sacral therapists, speech and language pathologists, pediatricians, and physical and occupational therapists routinely refer patients to us for evaluation and treatment. The resounding trust placed in our expertise by these specialists speaks volumes about the quality of care we provide and the transformative impact of our services.

A Testimonial of Trust

One of the greatest testaments to our dedication is the number of families who return with their next baby seeking our help and refer their family and friends. We are deeply honored by the trust bestowed upon us by these families, and it fuels our commitment to excellence in every aspect of our practice.

Dr Geisler was very knowledgeable and shared lots of information regarding infant tongue and lip tie. I knew my infant was receiving the best diagnosis, treatment and care. Highly recommend!!

Kristina Barten

Terms to Know:

Lingual Frenulum: a natural connective tissue holding the tongue to the mouth’s base

Lingual Frenectomy or Frenuloplasty: tongue tie release

Maxillary Labial Frenulum: a natural connective tissue holding the upper lip to the upper gums

Buccal Frenulum: holding the cheeks to the upper gums in the canine area

More Definitions

Gentle Release with Advanced Technology

When necessary, Dr. Geisler performs gentle Frenectomy procedures for infants under 18 months using a state-of-the-art carbon dioxide laser. This advanced technology allows for precise and minimally invasive releases, minimizing discomfort for your baby. Throughout the process, we keep your baby swaddled and awake, prioritizing their safety.

A Comforting and Supportive Environment

We understand the importance of creating a positive and nurturing environment for both your baby and your family. After the procedure, we provide a calm and supportive setting in our dedicated infant feeding room, where parents can comfort and feed their baby. Our goal is to ensure that your little one feels secure and cared for as they recover from the procedure.

What is a Frenectomy or Frenuloplasty?

The frenulum, a natural connective tissue holding the tongue to the mouth’s base, can lead to various problems if it restricts movement and function. A tongue tie release, termed as frenotomy, frenectomy, or frenuloplasty, improves mobility by modifying the frenulum, addressing any limitations.

Adolescent & Adult Tongue and Lip Tie Release

Comprehensive Evaluation and Care

At our facility, we believe in a comprehensive and compassionate approach to care. Dr. Geisler takes the time to thoroughly evaluate each patient, considering all aspects of their well-being. During the evaluation, she discusses the presence and potential impact of tongue and lip ties. This collaborative approach ensures that the patients or their families are well-informed and empowered to make the best decisions for themselves or their little ones. When diagnosing a tongue tie, we also discuss the appropriate timing for a frenectomy. This may involve a “functional frenuloplasty” for adolescents and adults using sutures, while for babies under 18 months, we utilize a CO2 laser, leaving the site open. Can You Release the Day of The Consultation?

Partnering in the Transformative Journey

As you embark on this transformative journey with us, we assure you that our compassionate team is here to support you every step of the way. Trust us to provide the best care for you or your little ones, as we strive to enhance oral function and overall well-being!

FAQs & Resources

What are symptoms a baby with a tongue tie may have?

  • difficulty achieving a good latch
  • falls asleep attempting to nurse
  • slides or pops off breast when attempting to nurse
  • clicking, swallowing air or inflated tummy
  • short sleep episodes (needing to feed frequently)
  • strongly pursed lips
  • child appears to have a small mouth
  • child will not open their mouth wide to feed
  • child appears to have a short tongue
  • heavy or noisy breathing
  • snoring (even a little)
  • witnessed events of breathing stopping (apnea)
  • unable to keep pacifier in
  • waking up congested
  • sleeping only in upright position
  • unhappy when laying on back
  • torticollis
  • arches back when put to breast
  • discomfort when upper lip is raised by adult
  • gagging once solid food introduces
  • needing to supplement after a nursing session
  • picky and messy eater once solid food is introduced
  • colic
  • milk leaking out sides of mouth or nose during feedings
  • failure to thrive, not gaining weight
  • falling off the babies growth curve for weight
  • long nursing sessions, baby not satisfied with session
  • swallowing air
  • uncoordinated suck-swallow-breathe pattern
  • excessive gas
  • gulping or just “drinking” a heavier let down
  • clicking sound while nursing
  • cannot keep nipple of a bottle in mouth
  • biting or chomping on bottle nipple instead of sucking
  • blisters on lip(s) and or tongue
  • difficulty swallowing
  • choking on milk
  • unable to move tongue side to side and lift up
  • heart shaped tongue or cleft or notch in tip of tongue
  • can extend tip of tongue over lower ridge only or not even to lower ridge
  • cannot raise tongue
  • high and narrow palate
  • retracted lower jaw
  • plagiocephephy, brachycephaly, or scaphocephaly head shape, or commonly heard is a flat spot on the head
  • a scissors “snip” at birth that did not resolve problem
  • a health professional suggesting a tie may be a problem

What is the best age to release a baby's lip and tongue tie?

Research has shown that as soon as the baby is ready, in the opinion of the care team, the results are higher than those who wait. 

Are tongue ties a new thing?

The short answer is no, they are not new.  Stories of Moses point to his tongue tie and well as some other Biblical texts.  As early as 1473, it was taught to midwives to use a sharp nail to divide a tongue tie.  What is new is the attention it is getting and the number of procedures done.  The huge increase in procedures has made main-stream medicine very worried.  Studies in the past only studied ties that go to the tip of the tongue, so the incidence was found to be between 1  and 12.1%, depending on the study.  A recent study of all babies born in one hospital for one year, the incidence of ankyloglossia was 46.3% of which around 70% were symptomatic.   The difference is that this study looked for posterior tongue ties as well as ties to the tip of the tongue.

What are the long term implications of a tongue-tie?

Have you ever received the advice to “wait and see,” only to realize that waiting isn’t always the best course of action? This phrase is often uttered by healthcare professionals, even when early signs of airway-related breathing issues are present in children. Today, we understand that addressing underdeveloped upper and lower jaws in children aged 4 to 10 can yield more predictable and successful outcomes compared to waiting until their growth potential diminishes in their teenage years.

 

The consequences of a compromised airway are significant. A narrow nasal airway often leads to mouth breathing and vice versa. Mouth breathing, unfortunately, lacks the benefits of filtering, humidifying, warming the air, and stimulating the release of vital compounds like nitric oxide, all of which nasal breathing accomplishes effectively. In addition, mouth breathers tend to take in excessive air while expelling excessive carbon dioxide, the primary driver of our breathing. This imbalance can lead to a negative cycle of chronic hyperventilation.

 

Have you ever awakened with a dry mouth? That’s often a sign of nocturnal mouth breathing. Inflamed tonsils may also be attributed to the irritation caused by inhaling air through the mouth. Dark circles under the eyes, referred to as venous stasis, can result from mouth breathing and the constriction of facial bones, leading to blood pooling beneath the eyes. Furthermore, mouth breathing can contribute to conditions like asthma, as it limits the exchange of air in the lower lungs, leaving one-third of the air unexchanged.

 

Read more 

FAQs & Resources

Are tongue ties a new thing?

The short answer is no, they are not new.  Stories of Moses point to his tongue tie and well as some other Biblical texts.  As early as 1473, it was taught to midwives to use a sharp nail to divide a tongue tie.  What is new is the attention it is getting and the number of procedures done.  The huge increase in procedures has made main-stream medicine very worried.  Studies in the past only studied ties that go to the tip of the tongue, so the incidence was found to be between 1  and 12.1%, depending on the study.  A recent study of all babies born in one hospital for one year, the incidence of ankyloglossia was 46.3% of which around 70% were symptomatic.   The difference is that this study looked for posterior tongue ties as well as ties to the tip of the tongue.

What are symptoms a baby with a tongue tie may have?

  • difficulty achieving a good latch
  • falls asleep attempting to nurse
  • slides or pops off breast when attempting to nurse
  • clicking, swallowing air or inflated tummy
  • short sleep episodes (needing to feed frequently)
  • strongly pursed lips
  • child appears to have a small mouth
  • child will not open their mouth wide to feed
  • child appears to have a short tongue
  • heavy or noisy breathing
  • snoring (even a little)
  • witnessed events of breathing stopping (apnea)
  • unable to keep pacifier in
  • waking up congested
  • sleeping only in upright position
  • unhappy when laying on back
  • torticollis
  • arches back when put to breast
  • discomfort when upper lip is raised by adult
  • gagging once solid food introduces
  • needing to supplement after a nursing session
  • picky and messy eater once solid food is introduced
  • colic
  • milk leaking out sides of mouth or nose during feedings
  • failure to thrive, not gaining weight
  • falling off the babies growth curve for weight
  • long nursing sessions, baby not satisfied with session
  • swallowing air
  • uncoordinated suck-swallow-breathe pattern
  • excessive gas
  • gulping or just “drinking” a heavier let down
  • clicking sound while nursing
  • cannot keep nipple of a bottle in mouth
  • biting or chomping on bottle nipple instead of sucking
  • blisters on lip(s) and or tongue
  • difficulty swallowing
  • choking on milk
  • unable to move tongue side to side and lift up
  • heart shaped tongue or cleft or notch in tip of tongue
  • can extend tip of tongue over lower ridge only or not even to lower ridge
  • cannot raise tongue
  • high and narrow palate
  • retracted lower jaw
  • plagiocephephy, brachycephaly, or scaphocephaly head shape, or commonly heard is a flat spot on the head
  • a scissors “snip” at birth that did not resolve problem
  • a health professional suggesting a tie may be a problem

What are the long term implications of a tongue-tie?

Have you ever received the advice to “wait and see,” only to realize that waiting isn’t always the best course of action? This phrase is often uttered by healthcare professionals, even when early signs of airway-related breathing issues are present in children. Today, we understand that addressing underdeveloped upper and lower jaws in children aged 4 to 10 can yield more predictable and successful outcomes compared to waiting until their growth potential diminishes in their teenage years.

 

The consequences of a compromised airway are significant. A narrow nasal airway often leads to mouth breathing and vice versa. Mouth breathing, unfortunately, lacks the benefits of filtering, humidifying, warming the air, and stimulating the release of vital compounds like nitric oxide, all of which nasal breathing accomplishes effectively. In addition, mouth breathers tend to take in excessive air while expelling excessive carbon dioxide, the primary driver of our breathing. This imbalance can lead to a negative cycle of chronic hyperventilation.

 

Have you ever awakened with a dry mouth? That’s often a sign of nocturnal mouth breathing. Inflamed tonsils may also be attributed to the irritation caused by inhaling air through the mouth. Dark circles under the eyes, referred to as venous stasis, can result from mouth breathing and the constriction of facial bones, leading to blood pooling beneath the eyes. Furthermore, mouth breathing can contribute to conditions like asthma, as it limits the exchange of air in the lower lungs, leaving one-third of the air unexchanged.

 

Read more 

What is the best age to release a baby's lip and tongue tie?

Research has shown that as soon as the baby is ready, in the opinion of the care team, the results are higher than those who wait. 

Not Sure There is
a Tongue or Lip Tie?

If you are questioning whether or not there is a need for a tongue or lip tie release, we provide a few ways you can find out. Check out our FAQ page or take the Quiz to see what care may be necessary:

Not Sure There is a Tongue or Lip Tie?

If you are questioning whether or not there is a need for a tongue or lip tie release, we provide a few ways you can find out. Check out our FAQ page or take the Quiz to see what care may be necessary:

Take The Quiz